Published: Fri, September 14, 2018
Sports | By Jonathan Ford

Jamie Murray: Serena Williams' sexism claims are 'a bit far-fetched'

Jamie Murray: Serena Williams' sexism claims are 'a bit far-fetched'

The Serena Williams US Open controversy rages on.

Williams and Ramos clashed in the final of the US Open, after the American picked up three code violations during her match against Naomi Osaka.

"I think mixed raced people's success, such as Osaka's, can help to bring down the wall most Japanese have between people with different backgrounds", Oliver said.

"There's no equality when it comes to what the men are doing to the chair umpires and what the women are doing, and I think there has to be some consistency across the board", Adams continued.

"I'm fine, given the circumstances", he told the publication. "For me to say "thief", and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark", she said, arguing that male athletes can and have said worse without receiving penalties.

It comes after a source told The Times some umpires are considering refusing to officiate matches involving Williams in the wake of her attack on Ramos.

However, others supported the official, who is among the most experienced in the sport, with the International Tennis Federation ITF saying he had acted with "professionalism and integrity" in the final.

However, the world's third-ranked men's player does not necessarily agree with the assessments of Williams and WTA chief executive Steve Simon that umpires treat women players differently from men. Williams was later given a violation for smashing her racket, costing her a point.

Williams claimed Ramos' actions in NY were "sexist" but speaking to BBC Sport yesterday, US Open mixed-doubles champion Murray said: "I think that's a bit far-fetched".

She said Williams" outburst "poisoned the atmosphere' for her opponent Naomi Osaka.

"For me, I don't feel sad because I wouldn't even know what I'm expected to feel", she said.

Williams' accusation of sexism has been backed by The Women's Tennis Association (WTA) and the United States Tennis Association (USTA), and this has seemingly upset a core group of umpires, according to The Times. "It's a delicate situation, but a la carte arbitration does not exist".

Although he does not experience much discrimination these days, he does still get stared at, he said, adding that he hoped the prejudice would eventually fade.

But Ramos has finally broken his silence regarding the backlash, speaking to Portugal's Tribuna Expresso. You are the best player at the end of this event and because of the turn of events with the crowd and the booing and everything, it wasn't the way - that was the outcome I was referring to.

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