Published: Thu, August 09, 2018
Science | By Joan Schultz

Perseids Meteor Shower Will Be One Of Year’s Best Sky Shows


"This is the meteor shower people view most because it occurs in the summer, when the nights are warm and comfortable, when you only have to worry about mosquitoes", Cooke told Space.com.

It last greeted us in 1992 and will next pass in 2126, but we travel through the comet's dust every year, making the Perseid Meteor Shower an annual event.

The annual Perseid meteor shower will be peaking this Saturday and Sunday night. That was most likely the Perseids.

Earth will pass through the path of Comet Swift-Tuttle from July 17 to August 24. There are some occasional bursts of higher meteor activity, the next one being predicted in 2028.

If you want to catch the Perseids in all their glory, a drive to the darkest place near your home should suffice.

There's no need to worry about meteors raining down on you, though, as Sky and Telescope says the bright streaks of the Perseids burning up are actually about 80 miles (128,748 meters) above your head and created by pieces of space debris about the size of a small pebble. Your meteor rates will be lower, but it's possible to see at least a few of the brightest meteors over the course of a few hours.

The Perseids are so-called because the point from which they appear, known as the radiant, lies in the constellation of Perseus. It's a rich meteor shower, and it's steady. As of this writing it appears as though there may be some clouds and perhaps even some rain showers over parts of southeast MA on Saturday and early Sunday.

By Monday morning, that boundary should have cleared and it looks like viewing conditions will be good for just about all of New England. And if you're intrepid enough to travel to a dark sky park, here are some of the absolute best in the United States.

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