Published: Thu, July 05, 2018
Medicine | By Douglas Stevenson

Study Shows Cofee may Boost Longevity

Study Shows Cofee may Boost Longevity

Don't panic. The results of a new decade-long study involving nearly 500,000 people suggest that drinking the beverage - in any quantity - leads to a longer life than not having any of it at all.

A population-based study that included people ages 38 to 73 drew an association between coffee and health, meaning that coffee might not be the cause of longevity, just a coincidental factor. The researchers found that the more cups of coffee people drank, the less likely they were to die during the study period.

The speed at which a person metabolized caffeine didn't seem to affect longevity, despite prior research that suggested coffee consumption might be related to increased risks of high blood pressure and heart attack among people who metabolize caffeine slowly.

It includes about half a million Brits who contributed their data and DNA to the United Kingdom biobank, and it finds an inverse relationship between people drinking up to eight or more cups per day and all-cause mortality.

No doubt more coffee studies will be along in the very near future. So if you drank that coffee, you had a slightly lower chance of dying during the 10 years the study examined.

The results support the recommendations of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, which states consuming three to five cups of coffee per day, or 400 milligrams per day, of caffeine is not detrimental to healthy individuals.

After 10 years of the study, results showed that non-coffee drinkers were more likely to have died than those who didn't drink coffee.

David Spiegelhalter, a University of Cambridge professor, estimates than an extra cup of coffee every day could extend the life of a man by around three months and a woman by around a month on average, as the BBC reported. The research adds to the growing list of studies that highlight the benefits of drinking coffee. The findings were true among all coffee drinkers, even those who might be more sensitive to the effects of caffeine. That study is particularly important, as it shows these benefits apply to African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and white people.

All kinds of coffee drinking habits were noted among the participants.

Walter Willett from the Harvard School of Public Health reveals in 2015 that the coffee bean is actually packed with nutrients and phyto-chemicals such as lignans, quinides, and magnesium. And it also doesn't matter what version of the "coffee gene" people have.

There are several possible explanations for the health benefits of coffee.

Past studies have indicated an inverse association between drinking coffee and the risk of developing chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, Parkinson's and cancers of the liver, bowel, colon and endometrium.

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