Published: Wed, May 16, 2018
Arts&Culture | By Antoinette Montgomery

Dirty jokes in Anne Frank's diary?

Dirty jokes in Anne Frank's diary?

The Jewish teenager apparently covered up the pages because she anxious that other people in her hideout would read them, as they contain a series of dirty jokes and her thoughts on sex education, said Ronald Leopold, director of Anne Frank House in Amsterdam. That the pages existed was already known, but she had pasted the two original diary pages with brownish paper.

Ronald Leopold, executive director of the Anne Frank House, said of the hidden pages, "Anne Frank writes about sexuality in a disarming way". On prostitution, Frank noted that "in Paris they have big houses for that".

It turns out the pages contained four jokes about sex that Anne herself described as "dirty" and an explanation of women's sexual development, sex, contraception, and prostitution.

Because Frank's diaries are so susceptible to damage, they typically only get inspected once every 10 years and those doing the job avoid touching the pages, according to the New York Times.

Frank's candid words on sex didn't make it into the first published diary, which appeared in English in 1952.

Mr Leopold said it shows how Miss Frank "creates a fictional situation that makes it easier for her to address the sensitive topics that she writes about".

Researches managed to uncover the text using digital techniques, by shining light through the pages and photographing them in high resolution. Given the great public and academic interest we have decided, together with the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands, to publish these texts and share them with the world.

Anne Frank was a Jewish girl living in Amsterdam during World War II. The family went into hiding in July 1942 and remained there, provided with food and other essentials by a close-knit group of helpers, until August 4, 1944, when they were discovered and ultimately deported to Auschwitz.

Anne, who died in a Nazi concentration camp before she turned 16, would have written the passages aged between 13 and 15. She had no idea she would one day become one of the Holocaust's most famous symbols.

Only Anne's father, Otto Frank, survived the war.

The Anne Frank House, a museum located in Frank's former hiding place, did not quote directly from the text it had recovered.

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