Published: Mon, April 16, 2018
Science | By Joan Schultz

Gmail Creating Self-Destructing Email Feature

Gmail Creating Self-Destructing Email Feature

Google promises a "fresh, clean look for Gmail on the web", with features like Smart Reply, the ability to snooze emails, and offline support. It has been acclaimed for its simplicity, robust feature set and usability.

The blockbuster Gmail upgrade comes as Google is expected to announce more big news in the coming weeks. This is similar to the LinkedIn message replying feature.

In a statement to The Verge, Google revealed: "We're working on some major updates to Gmail (they're still in draft phase)".

The California-based company could also showcase updates to Google Chrome, Google Photos, Android Wear, Google Home, and more.

"We need a bit more time to compose ourselves, so can't share anything yet-archive this for now, and we'll let you know when it's time to hit send". This icon will not only allow you to set an expiration date of a sent email but there's also a "Require Passcode" option that you can select if you want the recipient to confirm their identity with a passcode sent via SMS.

In an email to G Suite administrators, obtained by The Verge, the company says the new design will include "several new features" that will also be made available to regular Gmail accounts. Similarly, the actual security offered by this concept may also be limited, as the TechCrunch report notes that there is no control mechanism preventing the user from taking a screenshot of the message.

The other feature Google looks set to bring over of Inbox is the snooze option, which can temporarily hide an email from your Inbox until the time you are ready to deal with it.

The updated Gmail on desktop is also set to include two of the best features that are now available in Inbox by Gmail - Google's other email app.

When sending a message, you'll see a tiny lock icon called the "confidential mode". Not to mention if users OR senders are utilizing POP3/IMAP/SMTP to access their inbox.

So far, the only potential answer is a link with the message, "This message was sent with Gmail's confidential mode" the sent email reads. Once you click it, you can configure when you want the email to disappear.

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