Published: Tue, March 13, 2018
Sports | By Jonathan Ford

Slovakian interior minister resigns after street protests over murdered journalist Jan Kuciak

Slovakian interior minister resigns after street protests over murdered journalist Jan Kuciak

Its leadership was to meet later Monday to discuss the broader political implications of the first killing of a journalist in Slovakia's history.

"We think that only early elections would solve this situation", said Bela Bugar, chairman of Most-Hid on Monday evening after an eight-hour internal party discussion.

Bugar's announcement means the government created after the 2016 general election could fall apart soon.

Fico's government has been shaken by street demonstrators protesting the perceived lack of progress in the investigation into the death of investigative reporter Jan Kuciak, who probed fraud cases involving politically connected businessmen and organized crime.

Journalist Kuciak's last, unfinished story was about the activities of the Italian mafia in Slovakia and their ties to people close to Prime Minister Robert Fico.

Kalinak was one of the founding members of Fico's Smer-SD party, and held the post of interior minister during ten of the last twelve years.

Fico's three-party coalition, which also includes the centrist Slovak National Party (SNS), has 78 of 150 seats in parliament. For this reason, he said he had "decided to resign as deputy prime minister and interior minister".

Before Most-Hid announced its demand, Fico still seemed intent on continuing the coalition government. Kalinak's resignation was a key requirement of Most-Hid for it remaining in the coalition.

In statements, Kalinak made clear that he wanted to "preserve the stability in Slovakia".

Kalinak is Fico's key ally in Smer-Social Democracy, which has previously been alleged to have links to corruption.

An global team of journalists has been formed to complete Kuciak's story.

Like this: