Published: Tue, March 13, 2018
People | By Neil Grant

Mega Million, Powerball Lottery Jackpots Continue To Grow, Surpass $318M

Mega Million, Powerball Lottery Jackpots Continue To Grow, Surpass $318M

The stress set in after Doe purchased the winning ticket from Reeds Ferry Market in Merrimack, N.H. on January 6.

"If I told you she was ecstatic it would be an understatement", Shaheen said in an email to CNNMoney.

The mysterious victor of a $560 million lottery ticket who fought to keep her identity a secret is allowed to stay anonymous, a judge ruled on Monday. Jane Doe was the 11th Powerball jackpot victor in New Hampshire history, and her massive payout is the biggest in state history.

New Hampshire lottery rules have required the winner's name, town and amount won be available for public information, in accordance with open-records laws and to increase trust in the lottery system. They said she was upset after learning she was giving up her anonymity by signing the ticket - something the lottery commission acknowledged isn't spelled out on the ticket, but is detailed on its website.

He added that she had proved her privacy outweighed the public's interest in disclosing her name in the nation's eighth-largest jackpot.

Should her identity be revealed, "she will be subject to an alarming amount of harassment, solicitation and other unwanted communications", Judge Charles Temple of the Hillsborough Superior Court Southern District wrote in a 15-page decision.

A lawsuit filed by the woman's lawyers says she is an "engaged community member" who wants to go about public life "without being known or targeted as the victor of a half-billion dollars".

The woman, who is fighting to remain anonymous through an ongoing lawsuit, is collecting a lump-sum cash prize of $352 million - which will get whittled down to $264 million after taxes.

"While we were expecting a different outcome and believed the State had a strong argument, we respect the court's decision", McIntyre said.

Doe accepted the massive prize through her attorneys last week and made several donations to charity - including $150,000 to Girls Inc. and $33,000 each to three New Hampshire chapters of End 68 Hours of Hunger.

The commission says it will consult with the attorney general's office to determine what to do next regarding the case.

Lawyer William Shaheen said Monday the woman is from Merrimack, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Concord (KAHN'-kard).

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